The Clicker Center
Part 5
Six Teaching Strategies
In Part 4 you learned about the six foundation lessons. That tells you what you're going to teach. Now we're going to look at how. How do you get the behaviors to happen in the first place? We're going to look at six different strategies for getting behavior:

    Targeting
     Capturing
          Freeshaping       
     Pressure and Release of Pressure
    Molding
        Modeling  

In this section you'll see how inventive and creative clicker training can be. Just as people have different ways in which they learn best, so too do the horses. Instead of treating all horses the same, you'll see how you can tailor the teaching of the foundation lessons to your horse's individual needs as well as to your overall training goals.

The Six Foundation Lessons: Triggering Behavior
Home
About Us
Introduction
Course Contents
Part 1: Intro
Part 2: Getting Started
Part 3: Loopy Training
Part 4: Foundation Lessons
Part 5: Teaching Strategies
Part 6: Training Plans
Part 7: Cues
Part 8: Chains
Part 9: Clicker SuperStars
Part 10: Rope Handling
Part 11: Riding Pt 1
Part 12: Riding Pt 2
Part 13: Riding Pt 3
Part 14: A Look Ahead
Part 15: Bibliography
On-Line Support
Choosing your Teaching Strategy:
In this Unit I'll define each teaching strategy and I'll show you how you can use it to teach the six foundation lessons. For each of the six behaviors it's possible to use any or all of these teaching strategies, but as you'll see some are more useful than others. Which method you choose will depend upon how you are going to use the final, goal behavior plus your horse's individual experience.  

For example, if you're going to ride, you'll want to include the use of pressure and release of pressure in your training. Pressure and release of pressure is the primary communication system we use for riding. You'll want to familiarize your horse with it's use in a clicker-compatible way. You may choose to teach backing and head lowering, for example, via a lead rope.  

But if your horse comes to clicker training with a lot of unwanted baggage, you may not be able to begin with pressure cues. Pressure in the past carried with it the threat of "do it or else". Instead of feeling relaxed and enjoying the clicker game, this horse will be waiting for "the other shoe to drop." He'll be expecting bad things to happen at any moment. With this horse you might choose to begin with teaching strategies he won't have encountered before, such as targeting and free shaping.

Once you understand how each of these teaching strategies can be used, you'll be able to design a lesson plan that is tailored to your horse's needs.


The Six Teaching Strategies
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Intro
Part 5